1995

Tertre Roteboeuf, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru

This wine will be featured during Friday’s Behind the Bottle

Producer’s Tasting Note:In 1995, Tertre Roteboeuf managed to avoid the problem with stern tannins faced by so many growers. Close to fully mature, the wine offers sweet black raspberry, kirsch, mineral, earth, mushroom, herb, and iron scents. Medium-bodied, fresh and lively.

Critic Tasting Note: The wine of Tertre Roteboeuf is rich, racy, and plush. With age, the wine develops exotic, opulent textures and aromatic qualities and develops exotic, opulent textures and aromatic qualities.

In 1995, Tertre Roteboeuf managed to avoid the problem with stern tannins faced by so many growers. Close to fully mature, the wine offers sweet black raspberry, kirsch, mineral, earth, mushroom, herb and iron scents.

Tertre Roteboeuf is much better with at least 8-10 years of aging in good vintages. This allows the wine to soften and open its perfume. Older vintages need very little decanting, just enough to remove the sediment. Tertre Roteboeuf offers its best drinking and should reach peak maturity between 10-30 years of age after the vintage.

History of the Vineyard : The origins of the vineyards in Saint-Émilion date back to the prehistoric period. The first traces of human activity in the vicinity of Saint-Émilion go back at least to the Upper Palaeolithic period (35,000 to 10,000 B.C.). The naturally formed caves, forests, and generous water courses were very welcoming for the first peoples of the era. The Pierrefitte standing stone bears witness to their presence between 3,000 and 2,500 B.C. However, to find the first amphorae of wine, it is necessary to jump forward in time to 56 B.C. The history of local winemaking started at this point when the forest of Cumbis was cleared to plant the first vines. Grape varieties used around Massilia (Marseille) were grafted onto local vine stocks, vitis biturica. Proof of this can be found in the unearthed remains of villas, where sickles used for pruning or harvesting were discovered alongside the sites of presses and tanks. In 97 A.D., the Roman Emperor Domitius decreed that the best way to ensure the success of Italy’s wines was to eliminate competition in its colonies. As a result, many vines were torn out. This completely prevented any further expansion in Saint-Émilion, until the end of the 3rd century when the order was repealed by Probus. When the Roman Empire fell in the 5th century, the spread of Christianity, which uses wine in its religious rituals, contributed to the survival and expansion of wine growing.

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